Aludex

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Aludex

Aludex for Dogs

Aludex Demodectic wash is a prescription-only pet medication used for the treatment of local and generalised demodectic mange and sarcoptic mange in dogs caused by mites.

Aludex 50 g/l Concentrate for cutaneous solution is clear emulsifiable concentrate for dilution and topical application containing 5% w/v amitraz as Amitraz. On...

Aludex for Dogs

Aludex Demodectic wash is a prescription-only pet medication used for the treatment of local and generalised demodectic mange and sarcoptic mange in dogs caused by mites.

Aludex 50 g/l Concentrate for cutaneous solution is clear emulsifiable concentrate for dilution and topical application containing 5% w/v amitraz as Amitraz. On dilution with water, Aludex forms an emulsion.

Aludex is used for the treatment of local and generalised demodectic mange and sarcoptic mange in dogs and is intended for external use only. Shake the container/bottle before use.

Repeat treatment at weekly intervals for 2 to 6 weeks. Do not use Aludex simultaneously with other ectoparasiticidal preparations. Wear waterproof gloves, apron and face shield when handling Aludex and wash all protective clothing thoroughly after use, including the inside of gloves.

A Veterinary Pet Prescription is Required for Aludex

Understanding mange

The term “mange” is used to refer to a skin condition that is caused by the presence of parasitic mites, which can affect a whole host of animals including cats, dogs, horses, reptiles, wildlife such as foxes, and even humans. It is one of the easiest parasitic disorders to pass on from animal to animal, and as such, it can be hard to eradicate and keep from recurring, particularly if you keep several animals within the home, or your horse is stabled on a yard with others.

Mange is often connected with a general poor condition in pets, and in stray and wild animals, the condition is certainly rife. However, a diagnosis of mange certainly doesn’t automatically mean that an animal has been neglected; the condition can be picked up very easily, even by animals in excellent condition that are well cared for.

If you are concerned about a diagnosis of mange in your pet and want to learn more about the condition and what can be done about it, this article will cover some of the basics.

Mange is caused by a parasitic mite, which burrows into the skin and hair follicles of the animal, leading to irritation, soreness, loss of fur, and possibly, inflammation. It is generally very itchy for the affected animal, and will cause them to scratch and bother their skin obsessively, which can of course lead to problems in and of itself.

Mange in animals comes in two different forms: sarcoptic mange and demodetic mange respectively. While the result of an infestation with either type of mite will present with very similar symptoms, they are actually caused by two different families of mites.

Sarcoptic mange

Sarcoptic mange is also sometimes called canine scabies, although it is not exclusive to the dog. This type of mange is very infectious, and can be passed easily from dog to dog and to a variety of other animals as well. The mite responsible for sarcoptic mange is a type of burrowing mite called Sarcoptes scabiei canis.

Sarcoptic mange mites burrow into the top layers of the skin of the host animal, which leads to an allergic reaction that in its turn generates an intense pruritus or itchiness of the skin, as well as crusty skin, scab formation, and potentially, secondary infections. Loss of fur also often accompanies the condition.

Animals affected with sarcoptic mange must be kept in isolation from other animals until the condition is resolved, and special care must be taken with food bowls, bedding and other equipment used for the affected animal, as these too can harbour mites.

Demodetic mange

Demodetic mange is sometimes referred to by other names, such as red mange or demodicosis, and is caused by the Demodex canis mite. In some cases, small numbers of these mites can live on the skin of affected animals without causing any problems, and the natural immune system of the animal limits the development of the colony and keeps it in check.

However, for pets with a compromised immune system, or that are ill with another condition, the immune system may be unable to offer sufficient resistance to keep the mites in check, which can cause an outbreak on the skin that may be either localised or generalised.

If there are four or fewer affected spots on the skin, this is known as localised demodetic mange, while a systemic infection across the whole body is considered to be a generalised outbreak.

While sarcoptic mange is highly contagious between animals, demodetic mange is not actually normally contagious, other than potentially from a dam to their offspring. Most adult animals that are otherwise healthy tend to have a natural immunity that protects them from contracting demodetic mange.

How is mange diagnosed?

If an animal is afflicted with mange, this is usually fairly obvious as there will be sores, bald patches and inflamed areas on the skin, as well as intense itching. Your vet may need to take a skin scraping from an affected area for examination under a microscope, to identify the presence of the mites themselves.

However, microscopic examination is not 100% reliable, as low numbers of mites might mean that they do not show up under the microscope at all. Due to this, diagnosis of mange is often made on the basis of a physical examination alone.

How is mange treated?

There are a relatively wide range of options available when it comes to treating mange in animals, and your vet will discuss with you the best course of action for your own animal, based on your pet’s clinical history, the severity of the outbreak, and your own input.

Some of the most commonly used and most effective treatments for mange include:

  • A sulphur-based bath or dip such as LimePlus.
  • Washing or rinsing with a product such as Aludex to treat demodetic mange.
  • Injectable or oral antiparasitics.
  • Selamectin, Permethrin or Ivermectin topical treatments.

If you suspect that your pet is affected with mange of either type, it is important to get a firm diagnosis as soon as possible, so that treatment can be begun promptly to offer relief to the afflicted animal, and minimise the chances of the condition spreading to other pets.

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