menu Menu Search
RCVS Registered: 7025700
Run by a qualified team of Vets
FREE Standard Delivery over £29
Next Day Delivery available
Thyforon Tablets - 200, 800 and Thyforon 400 for Dogs - Vet Dispense UK

Thyforon Tablets

Thyforon 400 Tablets

Thyforon for Dogs are used for the treatment of hypothyroidism in dogs. The tablets are round, off white in colour with brown spots. They are scored into quarters and can be divided into halves or quarter according to the dose required by your Dog.

Thyforon Tablets are available in the following strengths: Thyforon 200, Thyforon 400 and Thyforon 800

A Veterinary Pet Prescription is required for Thyforon

Hypothyroidism in dogs Hypothyroidism is a relatively common condition in the dog, and is caused when the thyroid gland does not naturally produce enough of a hormone called thyroxine, which controls the metabolism of the dog to convert the dog’s food into fuel for life. The condition can occur for a wide variety of reasons including tumours, a shrinking thyroid gland and due to immune system imbalances, but the good news is that the condit...

Thyforon 400 Tablets

Thyforon for Dogs are used for the treatment of hypothyroidism in dogs. The tablets are round, off white in colour with brown spots. They are scored into quarters and can be divided into halves or quarter according to the dose required by your Dog.

Thyforon Tablets are available in the following strengths: Thyforon 200, Thyforon 400 and Thyforon 800

A Veterinary Pet Prescription is required for Thyforon

Hypothyroidism in dogs Hypothyroidism is a relatively common condition in the dog, and is caused when the thyroid gland does not naturally produce enough of a hormone called thyroxine, which controls the metabolism of the dog to convert the dog’s food into fuel for life. The condition can occur for a wide variety of reasons including tumours, a shrinking thyroid gland and due to immune system imbalances, but the good news is that the condition can generally be managed and treated very successfully on an outpatient basis.

Are certain types of dog more prone to the condition than others?
As a fairly common canine condition, hypothyroidism can potentially affect any breed or mixed breed of dog, but it is particularly common in the Dachshund, Golden Retriever, Doberman, Boxer and Cocker Spaniel. The condition does not generally become apparent until the dog is at least four years old, and is more likely to occur in large breeds, and in neutered dogs of either sex.

What causes hypothyroidism to develop?
The root cause of the condition is not always obvious, but some of the known causes of the condition include:

• Cancers and tumours that affect the thyroid gland.
• Congenital conditions.
• As a side effect of certain medications and surgical treatments.
• Iodine deficiencies.

What are the symptoms of hypothyroidism in dogs?
A relatively wide range of different symptoms can be seen as part of the condition, which can make it hard to definitively identify. Dog owners are advised to stay vigilant to the following symptoms, which may not all be apparent but that often appear in combination:

• Reluctance to exercise and general lethargy.
• Muscle weakness.
• Weight gain for no apparent reason.
• Loss of fur and excessive shedding.
• A dry, dull or otherwise poor condition coat.
• Persistent or recurrent skin infections with no obvious cause.
• A tendency to feel the cold more than normal.
• Infertility.
• In rare cases, head tilting or even seizures may occur.

How is hypothyroidism diagnosed?
Your vet will need to make a physical examination of your dog, as well as looking at their clinical history and talking to you about the signs and symptoms that you have noticed at home. If your vet suspects hypothyroidism, they will then perform some blood and urine panels on your dog, which may be enough to diagnose or rule out the condition.

However, in many cases, your vet will also need to perform endocrine tests to determine the levels of the T3 and T4 hormones (thyroid hormones) present within the body, and determine whether or not these are within normal parameters or lower than they should be. A radiograph may also be performed, to see if there is a problem or abnormality underlying the condition that can be treated.

Can hypothyroidism in the dog be treated?
Hypothyroidism in the dog cannot be reversed or cured, but it can be effectively managed. This will require the administration of supplemental thyroid hormones such as Thyforon or Soloxine to correct the body’s underproduction of their natural hormones, and your dog will require daily medications such as these for the remainder of their life to keep the condition under control.

Fortunately, the daily cost of administering medications such as these amounts to just a few pence, and so after diagnosis, the condition is not costly to manage.

Once your dog’s thyroid hormone levels have been brought under control, the symptoms of the condition will usually resolve themselves within a few weeks or months, returning your dog to their old selves.

Care and management of hypothyroidism
In order to keep the condition under control and keep your dog in good health, it is important to administer your dog’s medications regularly and in accordance with your vet’s guidelines. You will also likely need to make return visits to the clinic every few months so that your vet can monitor your dog’s thyroid levels, and make any necessary adjustments to their medications.

When your dog has first been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, your vet will also likely recommend feeding a special diet such as Hill’s R/D, to reduce their fat intake. Often, a special diet of this type is only necessary during the initial phase of treatment, until the condition is brought under control.

Dogs with hypothyroidism will generally lead an otherwise normal life once their condition is under control, and will be able to perform all of the activities that other dogs can, and usually live to old age in good health.

While a diagnosis of hypothyroidism can be worrying for the owner, it is one of the easiest and best known condition to treat on an ongoing basis, and should not affect the dog’s quality of life or wellbeing on the whole.

Read more Read less
close